For a complete introduction and to get to know each Quirkle, work your way across the main menu bar above. Have fun exploring, and please contact us with any questions you may have!

But that's not all. Check out the introductory video that explains why we created the Quirkles, or take a look at the sample book Gilbert Gas below.

 


Recent News

Here we go again. Another school year has rolled around. New students, new routines, new beginnings. Here’s our science challenge to you: DO science. We recently came across a quote we really like from venspired.com. It says, “Expecting a kid to learn only from a textbook is like asking them to look at a travel brochure and calling it a vacation.” So don’t just read science, have your students DO science. You’ll have more engaged students and they will learn while having fun.

But that’s too hard or time consuming you say? We’ve made it easy. Read the Quirkles® stories to teach the science concepts. Then try the experiments/activities we’ve provided in the books, Quirkles Teacher Guide, or More Quirkles Experiments book.

As an alphabet series, many begin their Quirkles year with Andy Acid and progress through the alphabet. That is absolutely fine. There is no set order to teach the Quirkles as each book is a stand- alone lesson. However, when we teach the Quirkles, we usually begin with Inquisitive Inman. This story centers on learning what a scientist does and the science process skills.

The very first activity we do?  We love to start with Inquisitive Inman’s Water Mystery. Talk about the “wow” factor. Kids love this! What a fun way to learn about the power of observation, solids and liquids and polymers too!

Best of luck as you head into your new school year. We’ll look forward to helping you have the best science year ever!

You’ve heard the expression a million times: the “dog days of summer.” Do you know where it comes from? 

Originally, the phrase had nothing to do with dogs, or even with the lazy days of summer. Instead, it turns out the dog days refer to the dog star, Sirius, and its position in the heavens.

To the Greeks and Romans, the “dog days” occurred around the day when Sirius appeared to rise just before the Sun, in late July, and lasted until about mid-August. They referred to these days as the hottest time of the year. “

While that translation has for the most part been lost, we probably can all agree that the “dog days” are the hottest and often most grueling days of the waning summer. How about a tasty treat to help you keep cool? Something as simple as a root beer float offers a teachable moment and a memorable way to learn about states of matter: solids, liquids, and gases. A scoop of ice cream (solid) with a little root beer poured over (liquid) creates some wonderful bubbly goo on top (gas). Dig in and enjoy!

Didn’t finish all the root beer? After eating your yummy science experiment, read the Quirkles Gilbert Gas and test to see if all the carbon dioxide has escaped from the remaining root beer. All it takes is a balloon, the remaining soda, and some salt.

Three Quirkles books feature activities that discuss states of matter. Gilbert Gas emphasizes gas as you might expect—but not just any gas—the very important carbon dioxide. Kitchen Chemistry Kal shows how a liquid can turn in to a solid as you make your own homemade ice cream. And Zany Science Zeke offers an interesting concoction (Zop) which changes back and forth from solid to liquid.

Enjoy our video which demonstrates the root beer float and Gilbert Gas activity. Also don’t forget this summer to integrate science into your daily activities. Stay cool and enjoy the Quirkles during these “dog days” of summer!

Resources

Great scientists have to have good observation skills. We know that is one of the science process skills. Here's a fun way to test the power of observation and to learn about polymers too.

How about some fun science activities that demonstrate states of matter? But the best part? After learning about solids, liquids, and gases, you can eat this tasty treat!                                                                                                            

What People Are Saying

I really appreciate your ideas and support!!! I am amazed at the Quirkles series that you have created and know you all must be FABULOUS teachers!!!

Cindy, Lower School Science Coordinator, Suffolk, VA

What People Are Saying

It is very hard to put into words exactly how much I love the Quirkles. They totally changed my attitude about teaching science to kindergarten and first graders as an enrichment class in my school.

Lynn, Gifted Teacher, Springdale, AR