For a complete introduction and to get to know each Quirkle, work your way across the main menu bar above. Have fun exploring, and please contact us with any questions you may have!

But that's not all. Check out the introductory video that explains why we created the Quirkles, or take a look at the sample book Gilbert Gas below.

 


Recent News

This summer, as you head out on that last vacation and get ready to take off in that massive plane, ponder this. How is it that today’s airplanes, some of which have a take-off weight of a million pounds or more, are able to get off the ground and then around the globe high above the clouds.

Surprisingly, with today’s technological advances, airplanes use the same principles of aerodynamics used by the Wright brothers in 1903. In order to gain an understanding of flight, it is important to understand the forces of flight (lift, weight, drag, and thrust), the Bernoulli Principle, and Newton’s first and third laws of motion. The simple but awesome activity in our video focuses on one of those aspects: the Bernoulli Principle.                           

So what is the Bernoulli Principle? It states that as air moves around an object, it creates different pressures on that object. Faster air means less pressure. Slower air means more pressure. The key to flight is creating pressure upwards on a bird's wing or an airplane wing to keep it in the air.

The same principles that keep airplanes in the sky also apply to this month’s featured activity from our Jazzy Jet book. The main point is that moving air is at a lower pressure than still air. This is the Bernoulli Principle. In the case of the bottle in our video, the air that is blown towards the mouth is deflected around the sides of the bottle (very little moves past the piece of paper). This means that the air pressure in front of the ball of paper is lower than behind, and so the paper flies out rather than in, seemingly defying logic! Children will try this over and over!

After Jazzy Jet’s Huff and Puff Challenge, grab some paper, design different types of paper airplanes, and go outside to test them. What a great way to spend a summer day, having fun and learning about flight too!

Summer is here and classes are out, but that’s no reason to quit enjoying all sorts of fun science activities! Something as simple (and tasty) as a root beer float offers a teachable moment and a memorable way to learn about states of matter: solids, liquids, and gases. A scoop of ice cream (solid) with a little root beer poured over (liquid) creates some wonderful bubbly goo on top (gas). Dig in and enjoy!

But that’s not all. After eating your tasty science experiment, read the Quirkles Gilbert Gas and test to see if all the carbon dioxide has escaped from the remaining root beer.  All it takes is a balloon, the remaining soda, and some salt.

Three Quirkles books  feature activities that discuss states of matter. Gilbert Gas emphasizes gas as you might expect—but not just any gas—the very important carbon dioxide. Kitchen Chemistry Kal shows how a liquid can turn in to a solid as you make your own homemade ice cream. And Zany Science Zeke also offers an interesting concoction (Zop) which changes back and forth from solid to liquid.

Enjoy our video which demonstrates the root beer float and Gilbert Gas activity. But also don’t forget this summer to integrate science into your daily activities.  Enjoy and have a Quirkles summer!

Resources

You won’t believe the outcome of this activity. It’s not magic; it’s science!

How about some fun science activities that demonstrate states of matter? But the best part? After learning about solids, liquids, and gases, you can eat this tasty treat!                                                                                                            

What People Are Saying

I really appreciate your ideas and support!!! I am amazed at the Quirkles series that you have created and know you all must be FABULOUS teachers!!!

Cindy, Lower School Science Coordinator, Suffolk, VA

What People Are Saying

It is very hard to put into words exactly how much I love the Quirkles. They totally changed my attitude about teaching science to kindergarten and first graders as an enrichment class in my school.

Lynn, Gifted Teacher, Springdale, AR