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Have A Quirkles Summer

Summer is here and classes are out, but that’s no reason to quit enjoying all sorts of fun science activities! Something as simple (and tasty) as a root beer float offers a teachable moment and a memorable way to learn about states of matter: solids, liquids, and gases. A scoop of ice cream (solid) with a little root beer poured over (liquid) creates some wonderful bubbly goo on top (gas). Dig in and enjoy!

But that’s not all. After eating your tasty science experiment, read the Quirkles Gilbert Gas and test to see if all the carbon dioxide has escaped from the remaining root beer.  All it takes is a balloon, the remaining soda, and some salt.

Three Quirkles books  feature activities that discuss states of matter. Gilbert Gas emphasizes gas as you might expect—but not just any gas—the very important carbon dioxide. Kitchen Chemistry Kal shows how a liquid can turn in to a solid as you make your own homemade ice cream. And Zany Science Zeke also offers an interesting concoction (Zop) which changes back and forth from solid to liquid.

Enjoy our video which demonstrates the root beer float and Gilbert Gas activity. But also don’t forget this summer to integrate science into your daily activities.  Enjoy and have a Quirkles summer!

Posted: May 30, 2019

Experiments

Gilbert Gas's Balloon

5/30/19

How about some fun science activities that demonstrate states of matter? But the best part? After learning about solids, liquids, and gases, you can eat this tasty treat!                                                                                                            

Mary Motion’s Plummeting Egg

4/29/19

This month we celebrate Sir Isaac Newton. He is credited with the quote, “What goes up, must come down.” Let’s just see about that! This activity might take some practice, but it’s worth the effort!

 

Timothy Tornado’s Water Race

4/1/19

Tornadoes are anything but fun and games. Here are some warning signs: a dark, often greenish, sky, wall clouds, large hail often in the absence of rain, air may become very still, and a loud roar similar to a freight train may be heard.

Susie Sound’s Musical Glasses

3/4/19

See how the amount of water makes the sound change. Through this investigation, learn about sound and make beautiful music, too!

Density Dan’s “Groovy” Lava Lamp

2/3/19

A clear plastic bottle, some vegetable oil, food coloring, and an antacid tablet can teach about density, light, coloring mixing, carbon dioxide, and immiscibility. It only takes a few minutes, too!

 

 

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